Bukchon Hanok: A Quick Walk to this Traditional Village in the Heart of Seoul

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On the day of our flight home, we walked around Bukchon Hanok Village, which is a traditional Korean village preserved in the advanced city of Seoul. Bukchon means northern town as it is in the north of the Jongno area, while hanok is what traditional Korean houses are called in the Joseon dynasty. This village is between Gyeongbokgung and Changdeokgung Palace and, sure, is pretty at 7:00 AM.

READ SEOUL SEARCHING IN MAY: 5-DAYS SOUTH KOREA ITINERARY AND TRAVEL GUIDE

Bukchon Hanok Village

HOW TO GO TO BUKCHON HANOK VILLAGE

Ride the subway and transfer to any station in Line 3. From there, go down to Anguk Station and take Exit 3.  The train fare is KRW 1050 if you’re around Dongdaemun and Myeongdong.

From Anguk Station Exit 3, walk straight along Bukchon-ro street for about 650 meters. You have to turn left to Bukchon-ro 11-Gil street but no worries since there will be big signs of the village along the main road. It is a 15-20 minute walk.

Bukchon Hanok Village

WHAT TO SEE AND DO IN BUKCHON HANOK

  • Go to Bukchon Traditional Crafts Center to check out the Korean art and crafts museum. The center also offers classes and lectures on traditional calligraphy classes, tea ceremonies, and pansori, and traditional Korean crafts like Hanji dolls and embroidery.

Traditional Tea Ceremony at Bukchon Hanok Village – P2,048 ($41.1)
Traditional Knot Ornament Making Experience in Bukchon Hanok Village – P291 ($5.7)
DIY Mother-of-Pearl Experience in Bukchon Hanok Village – P833 ($16.4)
Write Your Name in Korean Calligraphy in Bukchon Hanok Village – P2917 ($57.6)

  • Wear traditional Korean dress hanbokThe hanok’s interior and exterior are surely an excellent background for your hanboks.
  • Attend a Korean Cooking Class. You can learn how to make bibimbap, bulgogi, or other Korean foods.
  • Stay Overnight and experience how it is to live in a traditional Korean house.

Also, Bukchon Hanok Village is still a residential village in Seoul, so most of the hanoks are closed. You’ll see a lot of signs of “Silence Please” because despite that it is a tourist spot, we still need to show some respect to the residents.

Klook.com
Klook.com

As for us, we didn’t do any activity, for we are chasing time, and most of the hanoks are still closed at 7 AM. I saw in social media how the crowd could be here, so visiting it early in the morning is already a travel satisfaction to us. We just took some photos and looked around. It was a lovely place that I’ll surely visit again someday in a cute hanbok.

An empty alleyway in Bukchon Hanok VillageA girl in white dress and black coat standing in front of a door of a hanok in Bukchon Hanok Village

A traditional door of a hanok in Bukchon Hanok Village in Seoul
A girl standing in front of a big door of a hanok in Bukchon Hanok Village

SO IS BUKCHON HANOK WORTH THE VISIT?

Yes, if you’re that kind of traveler who is into a cultural experience, especially arts, craft, and architecture. The place itself is already unique for a modern city. I didn’t experience much here on my visit, but it made into my “I’ll return for you” list. I definitely want to stay overnight in a hanok and attend Korean cooking classes soon.

But if you travel for the ‘gram, then definitely Bukchon Hanok is a gorgeous backdrop on your Instagram photos.

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An empty alleyway of hanoks with text What to do in Bukchon Hanok Village Seoul

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